Adrian and Denise's Travel Diary.

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June 16 - Miena

June 16 - Miena

2014. June 16.

In the central highlands at the foot of the great lakes, 3000 of them, is Miena and Liawene, famous for trout fishing and deer hunting and being the coldest place in Tassie.
And we agreed, -2 to 1 in the mornings and 5 during the day, so we rugged up when outside and had the heater going inside.
A glacier scraped through here more than 10,000 years ago and you can tell by the flat areas between mountains, vegetated by hardy shrubs because of ice prone winds and snow.
It was a good experience and we admired the early pioneers who hacked their way through harsh conditions to settle here.

 

June 10 - Bothwell

June 10 - Bothwell

2014. June 13.

The 80 km drive towing the van from Ross to Bothwell was on very bad, windy, bounce, slippery road, then we came to the dense fog - great. But it did look beautiful and although we could only take shots through the windscreen, (me one handed with the DSLR and Denise with the compact) it was a good capture considering.
Bothwell is a very small (you can throw a rock from one edge of town to the other and sideways literally) the people were friendly and welcoming, the council van park was cheap with power, water, amenities and free laundry, what more could you ask for.
Well, the buildings had a lot of character and our neighburs were very quiet. (we were next to the cemetery)
There was a federation style place with 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, all renovated, on half an acre, for about $250 that was tempting for a summer retreat.
The golf course was the first in the southern hemisphere and is about to be extensively upgraded. It's owned by the same guy who created the famous Barnbougle course. This one has many historical elements so they're going to have audiovisual tours via ipod type gadgets so you can walk around and be told of the different things there. Like the oldest chook pens and so on. The course winds itself around a working sheep farm so you shoot over sheep paddocks and fences, over outhouses, over creeks and around bloody big gums.
A drive around a southern loop took in some more original buildings, any one of which would make a beautiful home, and most with views.
All in all, a beautiful area of tassie.

 

 

June 9 - Oatlands

June 9 - Oatlands

2014. June 09.

Another historical village, bigger than Ross, with most buildings of sandstone heritage architecture.
We had one of the biggest burgers we've ever seen and I couldn't finish it - snack later.
The flour windmill still operates full time, producing supposedly one of the best flour around.
There was a huge military barracks, jail and court house with a gallows, but there's not much left.

 

 

June 8 - Ross

June 8 - Ross

2014. June 08.

A beautiful little village where every building is original and perfectly restored/maintained as you will see from the photos.
The Ross Bridge is famous for its carvings by one of the convicts who wryly made icons that on the surface of it were innocent enough but in fact he was thumbing his nose to the officials.
A female prison/factory was here with about 600 prisoners with their chidren, thier quarters strongly and handsomely built.
We only stayed a couple of days but it was the most peaceful stay we've had in Tassie, on a river, a magnificent church in view, and only two other peope in the van park.
A bit chilly at -3 to 1 in the mornings nd 11 during the day but worth the visit.

 

June 7 - Campbelltown

June 7 - Campbelltown

2014. June 07.

Full of historic buildings, it was founded in 1821 by Gov Macquarie, it was a very pretty town of only about 900 people.
Some of the finest merino wool in the world is found in this area.
We were passing through for lunch but it's midway between Hobart and Lonnie and the stop point for hundreds of cars/people on the way to the AFL in Lonnie, so we made do with a piece of fish from an old shop at the edge of town, even though there was a Subways and a few posh cafes in town - packed to the rafters.

 

June 5 - Mt Barrow

June 5 - Mt Barrow

2014. June 05.

Mt Barrow was 1 degree at noon with ice formations on the ponds and views to the mountains all around for ages.
Our hands and faces were numb with the cold even though we had gloves on, fingerless though.
The brochure told of walks and toilets but as usual there were none to be seen.
The road up and down was extremely steep, narrow and treacherous which made Denise very nervous. We were the only ones in the area and up there for the few hours we were there.
Would love to see it in the snow but will need to rug up more and have snow chains.

 

June 3 - Launceston

June 3 - Launceston

2014. June 04.

We loved Lonnie as the locals call it. Magnificent restored buildings, residential and commercial, are everywhere, in fact hardly a modern place in sight, and what there is is extremely modern and eye catching. It must have been a wealthy area because most of the buildings are beautifully restored. It was difficult to park anywhere to take photos so unfortunately there aren't many photos of the grand houses.
Grindelward outside Lonnie is a swiss suburb with monster houses on large land overlooking a lake and the river, and you can get a beaut one for just $700K - a bargain.

June 01 - Evandale

June 01 - Evandale

2014. June 01.

Drove down to Evandale, only about 15 minutes south of Launceston, a very pretty town full of historic buildings, tree lined streets, convict brick mansions and a first class Sunday market.
A penny farthing race is held annually in town with competitors from all over the world.
We walked along the main street to photograph an unusual church and were invited in for lunch by as it turns out, a couple we met months before in a forest. The hospitality and fellowship was a delight and we lunched and chatted for ages.
The church interior was interesting inside too with its closed off pews and a chandeleir from Scotland. Grant opened the church just for us to view and photograph the interior. A lovely day.
The town had a very peaceful feel to it.


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